The “Q” Word

Be forewarned: this blog post and vloggy bit will use the controversial “q” word.  If that is something you find triggering or too offensive to discuss possibly reclaiming, then you probably want to skip this post and vid.

Also, this was supposed to post Thursday, but YouTube did not agree.  Time-frames referenced will be a bit off.

In other news, after my VR the other night (and from here on, I’m duplicating my discussion post from my class), I got curious and went in search of some maps that break down smoking laws by state and LGBT protections by state.  Defining strong tobacco regulations as 100% smoke free workplaces, restaurants, and bars and strong LGBT protections as having a transgender-inclusive employment non-discrimination act (ENDA), this is what I came up with:

Strong LGBT/

Strong Tobacco

Weak LGBT/

Weak Tobacco

Weak LGBT/

Strong Tobacco

Strong LGBT/

Weak Tobacco

Hawaii

Washington State

Oregon

Utah

Minnesota

Iowa

Illinois

Maine

Vermont

Massachusetts

Rhode Island

New Jersey

Delaware

Maryland

Alaska

Wyoming

Oklahoma

Texas

Missouri

Arkansas

Mississippi

Kentucky

Tennessee

Alabama

West Virginia

Virginia

South Carolina

Georgia

Arizona

Montana

North Dakota

South Dakota

Nebraska

Kansas

Michigan

Ohio

 

Washington DC

The remaining states were what I decided to define as “wishy-washy” on one measure or another:  either their ENDA is not trans-inclusive or their smoking protections cover only one or two of the three criteria mentioned above.  (Connecticut, I am disappointed!  We need to strengthen our smoking laws.)

So, there is at least one in each category, so long as you count DC.  To do a real study, obviously one would need stronger definitions and measures than what I just cobbled together based on what maps I could find on a quick Google search.  For the smoking regs, it would probably make sense to use the same state tobacco environment factor scores as Hatzenbuehler, Keyes, Hamilton, & Hasin (2014, p. e129), though they would have to be recalculated to account for any changes over the last couple of years.  And then you’d need a similar measure for LGBT protections, preferably looking at something more than just ENDA or lack thereof.  But it looks at least theoretically possible to construct a study that would test whether reductions in smoking disparities between LGBT and heterosexual populations are linked more strongly to stricter tobacco regulation or stricter LGBT protections.

I’m not sure I’m quite curious enough to undertake that, though, at least not solo.

References:

American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. (2016). Reducing and Preventing Tobacco Use. Retrieved January 28, 2016, from http://www.acscan.org/tobacco/smoke-free/

American Civil Liberties Union. (2015). Non-Discrimination Laws: State by State Information – Map. Retrieved January 28, 2016, from https://www.aclu.org/map/non-discrimination-laws-state-state-information-map

Brooks, V. R. (1981). Minority stress and lesbian women. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.

D’Augelli, A. R., & Patterson, C. (1995). Lesbian, gay, and bisexual identities over the lifespan: Psychological perspectives. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Stern, K. (2009). Queers in history: The comprehensive encyclopedia of historical gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgenders. Dallas, TX: BenBella.
Wilchins, R. A. (2004). Queer theory, gender theory: An instant primer. Bronx, NY: Magnus Books.
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2 thoughts on “The “Q” Word

    • To go by the maps I used California is in the same boat as Connecticut: strong LGBT protections (defined as a transgender-inclusive ENDA), wishy-washy on tobacco, as defined by having 100% smoke-free only one or two of workplaces, bars, and restaurants. I’d have expected both states to be in the first column as well.

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